© 2015 Central Florida Tile Busters, LLC (DBA - Floor Busters of Central Florida) All Rights Reserved
Floor Busters of Central Florida, LLC

Removing a tile floor? You don’t need a bunch of fancy tools. Here’s what

you need.

Hammer Cold Chisel Bricklayer’s Chisel or     Scraper Pry bar Safety glasses If you are just removing one tile out of a tile floor, you need a few more tools: Grout saw Metal Straightedge Scoring Tool Center Punch Here’s what they do. You’ll use the hammer to tap the ends of the chisels and sometimes also the pry bar. The hammer provides striking power to move the chisels into grout or mortar or adhesives, or to start the action of the pry bar. The cold chisel is a thick rod of steel with one end that is flattened. This chisel is used mostly when getting a single piece of tile out of the surrounding floor (i.e. if the tile is broken and needs to be replaced). The flat end of the chisel goes into a scored line on the tile. It’s thick enough to break the tile at the scored line when the other end is struck with a hammer. Bricklayer’s chisel: The flattened end of this chisel is much thinner than that of the cold chisel. This tool is designed to knock away mortar and adhesives left behind when old tile is pried off. The pry bar does exactly what its name says: it pries up stuff. It’s about the same length as a hammer (for this kind of job; you can buy pry bars that are four feet long, but those are for different kinds of work). It is a solid piece of steel. One end is rounded; the other end is a fork-like shape with two tines that are flattened and curved upward. The fork-like end is the business end. You put the tines under the tile and push the top of the pry bar back and down. This leverage forces the tines up against the bottom of the tile. Safety glasses are made out of clear, strong material that protects your eyes from bits of flying material. The grout saw is needed if you’re removing a single piece of tile. This saw will cut through the grout that fills the joint between tiles. Grout is very hard material. Technically, you can get through it with just a chisel. The grout saw just makes things a lot easier. The metal straightedge is similar to a ruler. It acts as the guide for the scoring tool. The scoring tool has a handle and a metal blade. It creates a scratched line across the tile. When the cold chisel is set into this scratched line and tapped with a hammer, the tile will break along the line. The center punch is a small rod of steel with a pointed end. When set at the cross-point of two diagonally scored lines and struck with a hammer, it creates the first break in the tile. Not included in the above list, but important to have on hand, are a trash container and a broom or shop vac. These items keep the work space clean and uncluttered.
Learn  More 352-404-5235

 Tile-Removal Tools

© 2015 Central Florida Tile Busters, LLC (DBA - Floor Busters of Central Florida) All Rights Reserved
Floor Busters of Central Florida, LLC

Removing a tile floor? You don’t need

a bunch of fancy tools. Here’s what

you need.

Hammer Cold Chisel Bricklayer’s Chisel or     Scraper Pry bar Safety glasses If you are just removing one tile out of a tile floor, you need a few more tools: Grout saw Metal Straightedge Scoring Tool Center Punch Here’s what they do. You’ll use the hammer to tap the ends of the chisels and sometimes also the pry bar. The hammer provides striking power to move the chisels into grout or mortar or adhesives, or to start the action of the pry bar. The cold chisel is a thick rod of steel with one end that is flattened. This chisel is used mostly when getting a single piece of tile out of the surrounding floor (i.e. if the tile is broken and needs to be replaced). The flat end of the chisel goes into a scored line on the tile. It’s thick enough to break the tile at the scored line when the other end is struck with a hammer. Bricklayer’s chisel: The flattened end of this chisel is much thinner than that of the cold chisel. This tool is designed to knock away mortar and adhesives left behind when old tile is pried off. The pry bar does exactly what its name says: it pries up stuff. It’s about the same length as a hammer (for this kind of job; you can buy pry bars that are four feet long, but those are for different kinds of work). It is a solid piece of steel. One end is rounded; the other end is a fork-like shape with two tines that are flattened and curved upward. The fork-like end is the business end. You put the tines under the tile and push the top of the pry bar back and down. This leverage forces the tines up against the bottom of the tile. Safety glasses are made out of clear, strong material that protects your eyes from bits of flying material. The grout saw is needed if you’re removing a single piece of tile. This saw will cut through the grout that fills the joint between tiles. Grout is very hard material. Technically, you can get through it with just a chisel. The grout saw just makes things a lot easier. The metal straightedge is similar to a ruler. It acts as the guide for the scoring tool. The scoring tool has a handle and a metal blade. It creates a scratched line across the tile. When the cold chisel is set into this scratched line and tapped with a hammer, the tile will break along the line. The center punch is a small rod of steel with a pointed end. When set at the cross-point of two diagonally scored lines and struck with a hammer, it creates the first break in the tile. Not included in the above list, but important to have on hand, are a trash container and a broom or shop vac. These items keep the work space clean and uncluttered.
Learn  More 352-404-5235

 Tile-Removal Tools

© 2015 Central Florida Tile Busters, LLC (DBA - Floor Busters of Central Florida) All Rights Reserved
Floor Busters of Central Florida, LLC

Removing a tile floor? You don’t

need a bunch of fancy tools. Here’s

what you need.

Hammer Cold Chisel Bricklayer’s Chisel or     Scraper Pry bar Safety glasses If you are just removing one tile out of a tile floor, you need a few more tools: Grout saw Metal Straightedge Scoring Tool Center Punch Here’s what they do. You’ll use the hammer to tap the ends of the chisels and sometimes also the pry bar. The hammer provides striking power to move the chisels into grout or mortar or adhesives, or to start the action of the pry bar. The cold chisel is a thick rod of steel with one end that is flattened. This chisel is used mostly when getting a single piece of tile out of the surrounding floor (i.e. if the tile is broken and needs to be replaced). The flat end of the chisel goes into a scored line on the tile. It’s thick enough to break the tile at the scored line when the other end is struck with a hammer. Bricklayer’s chisel: The flattened end of this chisel is much thinner than that of the cold chisel. This tool is designed to knock away mortar and adhesives left behind when old tile is pried off. The pry bar does exactly what its name says: it pries up stuff. It’s about the same length as a hammer (for this kind of job; you can buy pry bars that are four feet long, but those are for different kinds of work). It is a solid piece of steel. One end is rounded; the other end is a fork-like shape with two tines that are flattened and curved upward. The fork-like end is the business end. You put the tines under the tile and push the top of the pry bar back and down. This leverage forces the tines up against the bottom of the tile. Safety glasses are made out of clear, strong material that protects your eyes from bits of flying material. The grout saw is needed if you’re removing a single piece of tile. This saw will cut through the grout that fills the joint between tiles. Grout is very hard material. Technically, you can get through it with just a chisel. The grout saw just makes things a lot easier. The metal straightedge is similar to a ruler. It acts as the guide for the scoring tool. The scoring tool has a handle and a metal blade. It creates a scratched line across the tile. When the cold chisel is set into this scratched line and tapped with a hammer, the tile will break along the line. The center punch is a small rod of steel with a pointed end. When set at the cross-point of two diagonally scored lines and struck with a hammer, it creates the first break in the tile. Not included in the above list, but important to have on hand, are a trash container and a broom or shop vac. These items keep the work space clean and uncluttered.
Learn  More 352-404-5235